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Ernest Saves Christmas

Ernest Saves Christmas I’ve decided I want to do more reviews and critiques, since I really enjoy writing them. So you’ll be seeing more posts about music, movies, and books that I’ve experienced lately.

I didn’t watch a ton of Christmas films this year, but I did see a couple. My boyfriend couldn’t believe that I hadn’t seen “Ernest Saves Christmas”, (or any of the Ernest movies for that matter), so when we saw it was on Netflix, I knew we’d end up watching it.

For those of you not not familiar with the Ernest movies, Ernest (played by Jim Varney) is a doofy, clumsy guy, probably in his thirties, who doesn’t seem to have a clue. He has a “friend”, Vern, who he well-meaningly harasses all the time, destroying his house trying to decorate for Christmas. You know, all the things real friends do. Vern’s perspective is always just the camera watching Ernest’s antics, and trying to push him out of the house. Read the rest of this entry

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Destruction Myth

A while back, I made a goal to read all the books in my possession that I have started, but not finished. As can be expected by my past track record with goals, I have not gotten very far. This weekend, however, I finished one of them.

I borrowed “Destruction Myth” from a friend on New Year’s Day this year. Took me long enough to finish it, right? This friend is an English Major and we always have fun talking about the books that we’ve read in classes. “Destruction Myth” was assigned for one of his poetry classes. It is a collection a poems by Mathias Svalina. Each poem is a creation myth, except for the last one, which is a bunch of destruction myths compiled into what I will call a segmented poem. Read the rest of this entry

Shakespeare, Undead

So, as promised, I am now going to talk about Shakespeare, Undead. I was pleasantly surprised by this book. The back is not descriptive at all, so I only knew that it involved Shakespeare and Zombies.

It turns out that Shakespeare is a Necromancer/Vampire who falls in love with a Zombie Hunter who has no clue he’s undead. The playwright is haunted by the ghosts of people from his past, who he gets rid of by writing their stories as plays.

There are a lot of cheesy moments, and I wasn’t sure I’d get through the first couple chapters, but I surprisingly became attached to the characters quite quickly. I love the references to Shakespeare’s plays, though some seem a bit too overt. There are also some fun nods to Shakespeare’s influence on contemporary pop culture, referencing the wizard of oz, the sixth sense, and Star Wars.

It is clear that the author took a class on Shakespeare or two. There are plenty of nods to Shakespeare’s association with Christopher Marlowe, the inconsistencies with the educated playwright and the man from Stratford Upon Avon, and even Queen Elizabeth.

This was a fun, lighthearted read with some neat twists, a couple fun sex scenes and enough irreverent humor that Shakespeare would probably approve. I may be becoming a Zombie literature fan. I don’t know what will become of me.

Repeat. (lai la lai)

So, yesterday on my drive home, I decided I was not in the mood for the radio, and I put my Ipod on. The song that had been on the radio had reminded me of “Welcome to the Black Parade” by My Chemical Romance. That is the only My Chemical Romance song I really know and definitely the only one I own. Most of why I love it so much is it reminds me of “Come Sail Away” by Styx. After all, they both start off slowly, with piano, and then get faster after the intro. “carry on” is a phrase used prominently in both songs. I don’t know if Styx is one of MCR’s role models, or if they like the song, or if it’s all a coincidence, but I do know that both songs garner an emotional response.

Anyway, after playing “Welcome to the Black Parade,” I scrolled through my artists to decide on what to listen to next. I didn’t have to go far. Mumford and Sons. Perfect. I started them off on random, but decided I wanted to listen to their cover of Simon and Garfunkel’s “The Boxer”. Read the rest of this entry

Dinosaurs

I am writing about dinosaurs because I now have a turtle, and when she stretches her neck, she reminds me of a brontosaurus.

Actually what I think of is not as adult as “brontosaurus”. I think “long-neck” because I am part of the Land Before Time generation.

And by “Land before Time”, I mean the first movie, not the 18 bazillion sequels, which decreased in quality as they went along.

The thing with Land Before Time is that the first movie was produced by George Lucas and Steven Spielberg. It was originally going to be a silent film. but they eventually added dialogue to make the story more clear. Many of the original elements were more intense than the final product, changes being made to be more appropriate for children.

I bawl every time I watch it. You might think that’s not often, but over the last year, that is simply not true. Read the rest of this entry