Category Archives: books

Fiction

I have just started reading The Princess Bride. I have heard a lot of negative and positive reviews, but never read the book. I know it apparently takes a while to get to the point sometimes, but I hope that adds to the humor.

So I got the 30th anniversary edition, and I am reading the introduction. It is hilarious. The author spins these marvelous stories about the history of the novel and his family life. And they’re all fake.

His introduction is just another drawn out story for the readers.

I love it.

It gives us this rich history, and puts the book into all sorts of fake contexts, and I think it’s really clever. And that made me think about the line between fiction and nonfiction. I love studying memoirs, but quite a few come under fire for holding falsities.

If the core of the novel is truth, then do the stories and specifics behind that truth need to be exact? Sometimes we learn more from fiction, right? It’s framed just right, and any leftover confusing aspects can be left out.

Anyway, that is enough rambling for now. Have a great Monday everyone!

Advertisements

Powell’s

So, I went to Portland (Oregon) last weekend, and of course, as any trip to Portland requires, I went to Powell’s. For those of you who don’t know, Powell’s is an amazing new and used bookstore. It takes up a whole city block and is three and a half stories high. The rooms are color-coded and organized by section. The blue room has literature and poetry. The Gold room is science fiction and mysteries. The Rose room has a lot of stuff, but most notably children’s literature. The purple room has a lot of non-fiction- race and gender studies. Travel is in the orange room. Graphic novels are in the room with the cafe (brown).

I can’t go to Powell’s without buying too many books. I think once I went there and only bought one or two. Not this time though. My Powell’s and Portland withdrawal led me to purchase a whole stack even though I already own many books I have yet to read. Guess I just need to dedicate more time to reading.

Here’s the list of books I bought, in case you’re interested Read the rest of this entry

From The Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

Some books rock the one-word title; others go for long and slightly absurd. I’m of course going to talk about the latter today.

From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler is a Children’s novel published in 1967. It is the story of a brother and sister pair who run away from home and live temporarily in the Metropolitan Museum of Arts. They discover a mystery and set out to solve it by seeking out Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, an eccentric, rich old woman. Read the rest of this entry

Special Places

In Jerry Spinelli’s book Stargirl, which I wrote about yesterday, Stargirl talks about enchanted places. Often these are places that she goes to meditate. This got me thinking about special places and why we need them.

As a child, I always wanted a tree fort. Forts are supposed to be magical places where secrets are kept and anything can happen. Forts offer a solace from the busy outside world. A tree fort offers the benefit of being literally rooted in nature. You’re surrounded by leaves, branches, the traces of animals. And the best thing about a tree fort is that it doesn’t just come to you. You have to ascend out of the everyday and into the magical. You might even have to build it yourself. Working for the ability to be in your own special place makes it even more magical. Read the rest of this entry

Stargirl

“We wanted to define her, to wrap her up as we did each other, but we could not seem to get past “weird” and “strange” and “goofy.” Her ways knocked us off balance. ”

One of my favorite books from childhood is Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli. The story is told by a high school junior, Leo, who is intrigued and greatly affected by a new girl in school, Stargirl. I won’t go into too much detail because I don’t want to ruin it for anyone, but this book is amazing. It shows the hive mind of high school and the world in general. it shows how people react to those who are “different”. It delves into what is “real” in life, and what we merely construct. It focuses on teenagers growing into adults, interacting with adults, and figuring out what this world is all about. A main point of the book is that it’s the little moments in our lives that can have the largest impact.

My partner and I both love books, so a couple of months ago we went to a few different used books stores. I saw Stargirl and just knew I wanted to read it again. Jordan said he was pretty sure there was a sequel. I was sure he was wrong. I would have known about that.

He was right. Read the rest of this entry